August 20, 2014

DIY Foaming Hand Soap ($1 for an entire year of soap)

Feb5

This is one tip you will want to do immediately!! Make your own antibacterial foaming hand soap in 30 seconds for just pennies

During a fit of panic,  I discovered this amazing trick.  I anticipated a large group of people any minute and went to touch up the guest bathroom. I realized that the bar of soap had been mauled by our children and didn’t look guest worthy at all.

(Is it possible for soap to be unhygienic? Because I am pretty sure this fit in that category.)

Our liquid soap dispenser was empty, so I quickly grabbed a little of my liquid soap, poured it in, added water and mixed.

Imagine my shock and delight when the soap that came out mimicked the exact foaming hand soap I had just splurged on at one of my favorite “scented” stores. :) Not only that, but it ended up lasting weeks and weeks.

That was years ago, quite possibly right after those neat foaming hand bottles started being sold, and I have never gone back.  When the kids were younger, the first few bottles I bought, I would guard. My “special” liquid soap was only for guests because they would pump and pump and pump. I saw quarters flying with each handful.

You will never have to worry about that again. They can pump to their hearts delight.

Do you see that huge bulk bottle of liquid soap?

I’ve had that thing for YEARS. Believe it or not, I purchased it at a yard sale (brand new) for $1 and it’s still going strong. (Tip for your super frugal types like me. If you will only use liquid soap to make Hand Foaming Soap, you really don’t want to store something this large. Feel to buy a smaller refill bottle. :))

Here’s how you make your own Foaming Hand Soap (or Antibacterial Foaming Hand Soap.)

It’s all about the bottle.

All you need to make your own Foaming Hand Soap:

  • Empty foaming hand soap bottle
  • liquid soap (your favorite kind)
  • water

Yes, that’s all you need.

You will need to purchase your favorite type of  foaming hand soap, so you have the bottle’s mechanism to make this work. After you buy it, leave just a small amount of soap in the bottle, dump 99% of the rest of the soap out and put it into another seal-able container for storage. You will use this soap as your refill for a LONG time.

DIY Foaming Hand Soap - make cheap antibacterial soap in seconds for only pennies a bottle.

How much soap you use will be up to you, but honestly, a little bit goes a long way. I have gotten away with only using a tablespoon, but I just pour a little bit into the empty bottle and then fill the rest up with water. Then mix by swirling around a bit. Leave a little room at the top to put the cap back on or it will overflow. It will take a pump or two to get it flowing and voila!

Depending on how much you use, one bottle of Bath and Body Works Liquid Soap could last you a year.

For those that are sensitive to scents or want a completely all natural soap, use your preferred non scented liquid soap, then add a few drops of your favorite Essential Oils. I have loved that option and my lavender oil bottle is still nearly full after a year.

I can guarantee, you will never use your soap another way again after trying this. I tell all my friends in real life about this tip, and can’t believe I’ve never shared about it on here.

Your kids will want to wash their hands all day.

I would love for you to consider sharing this great tip.  It’s revolutionized my budget. ;)

A Year of Antibacterial Foaming Hand Soap for pennies a bottle.  This is one tip you will want to do immediately!


Comments

  1. This is a fantastic trick to know, and it’s perfect for households with small kids who like to use as much soap as possible.

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  2. Such a great and simple idea! Thank you for sharing! Could the same be said for dish soap to extend its life as well?

    Thanks! :)

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    Jen Reply:

    Yes, in fact, that is what that huge bottle of bulk stuff is and it works great.

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    May Reply:

    @Jen,

    Great! Thank you!! :)

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    Rachel N Reply:

    @May, @Jen, I actually took an extra BBW foaming bottle to work for our common sink because they only buy Dawn in the huge bottle which isn’t super convenient. Everyone has loved having the small manageable bottle of Foaming Dawn!

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    Jen Reply:

    Bringing it to work is a PERFECT idea!!

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  3. Oooooo and you can use cinnamon essential oil for scent too!

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    Jen Reply:

    Yep, any scent works perfectly. :)

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  4. I hear Dr. Bronner’s works great to make foaming hand soap.

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  5. Melissa c says:

    I’ve been doing something similar…buying the soap on clearance and then using 1/4 of the bottle with added water; reserving the 3/4 in another empty bottle. My concern is how much soap do you need to make it really functional in killing germs and cleaning? I don’t want to be using foamy water and not getting the benefits of soap. Anyone have any ideas??

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    Rachel N Reply:

    @Melissa c, I’ve always been told that as long as you use water as hot as you can stand, and some soap to create friction, is really the most beneficial part to washing your hands. I don’t have any science data to back that up, but it makes sense to me! :)

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    Rachel B. Reply:

    @Melissa c, I’ve been concerned about that too with the proliferation of foaming soap hacks online. I like to use Dr. Bronner’s at a 4:1 ratio of water to soap. I’m a bit suspicious of diluting soap too much, unless an actual study comes out that suggests it does the job right.

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  6. I bought some foaming hand soap on clearance at Target and found two bottles at Big Lots for a really cheap price. I wanted a foaming dispenser for each sink in my house–five total. Now I have them and yes–wow it is so much more frugal to refill with a little liquid soap and water. I love it! And these dispensers are less messy-no soapy drips down the side on to the sink. I have a container by my kitchen sink that is not the best design. It flips over easily–not heavy enough at the bottom I think. I still wanted to use it so I put some glass button gems–the kind used as vase filler–into the bottom with the soap to weight it. Works great!

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    Jen Reply:

    Putting those gems in the bottom is a perfect idea. Smart thinking. PErfect to have one at each sink.

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  7. Love the idea of adding essential oils. I have used this method for several years now. Some times I use shampoo from the $$ store or cheap dish soap and even liquid hand soap. They all work well.
    Thank you.

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  8. kristy bartholomew says:

    WOW thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  9. I have been doing this for a few years, but I use Dawn with Olay, gentler on my hands, and using too much antibacterial soap is not good.

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  10. I guess I am confused. Why dump out the soap that comes in the bottle after you buy it? Are you adding a little back in for the scent each time? Or do you need it for another reason?

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    Jen Reply:

    Sorry for the confusion. I’ll go back and clarify.

    Yes, as I stated in the post, you dump it out but save it for later. This will be what you use as the “Refill.” You leave just a little bit of the initial soap in the bottle because the beauty of this is that you can stretch that one bottle full of soap for nearly a year. Hope that clarifies. Let me know if you have any questions. :)

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  11. @Rachel N,
    Yes, that’s how I understand it as well. Its not so much that I needs to be antibacterial because the friction and the bubbles are what lift the dirt and germs. I even saw somewhere that the temp of the water doesn’t matter either, but I still like it hot. (again, just the way I’ve always understood it)

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  12. http://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/show-me-the-science-handwashing.html
    The CDC shows that the main effect is from 20 sec. of scrubbing. Adding tea tree oil will give you some anti-bacterial effects. Thanks for the economical tips!

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    Jen Reply:

    So interesting, Daisy. Thanks for sharing that. :)

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  13. That’s cool. I LOVE saving money on everyday essentials. I’m going to have to try that soon!

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  14. Wonder full… I am glad you shared it. Handmade Soap has an advantage in that glycerine is not removed from the soap and has a strong moisturizing effect :)

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  15. Not sure why I’m a bit confused. After you dump 99% of foaming soap into a storage container –are you additionally adding some other liquid soap? Trying to figure out if you’re using liquid soap and the foaming soap together. Thanks!

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    Jen Reply:

    You keep just a tiny bit of the liquid soap in the pump that you will be using and fill the rest with water. NO, you are not using any additional foaming soap. It’s all in the bottle. That pump on top of the bottle is what makes it become foaming soap. Hard to believe, but it works.

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  16. Can I use castile soap instead?

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    Jen Reply:

    Another reader mentioned that she uses it and it works great. :)

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  17. I have been using Dr. Bronners peppermint castille soap, about a tablespoon of soap with water. It’s all natural and non-drying. Works great!

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  18. Suzanne Lien says:

    What a great idea your DIY foaming liquid soap! When I realized how much I was spending on foaming soap refills and that it’s just super diluted soap, I decided to make my own, too. Thanks so much!

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    Jen Reply:

    So thrilled that you found it helpful :)

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  19. I love this idea and have tried it before. Unfortunately, after a while, the part of the pump that makes it foamy started getting moldy. So I ended up throwing the whole bottle away. Have you had this problem?

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  20. terry brunton says:

    I’ve always just fine grated my hypoallergenic bath soap into a small pile (about 1 tablespoon into a pump bottle with hot water to the top which melts any tiny bits. I think the hand soap costs 1.49 and that was 2 years ago. Stays liquid.

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  21. I’ve been doing this for years. I just buy a big jug of regular liquid hand soap, pour a little in the bottom of a foamer bottle, fill the rest of the way with water and let it combine a bit before using. I’m a big fan of foam soap but have always thought it’s ridiculous to buy the expensive foaming solution. All it is is watered down liquid hand soap. It’s so easy to make yourself and saves you a lot of money. You do have to buy a new foamer bottle occasionally because the mechanism gets a little mucked up after a while, but it’s still cheaper than buying new bottles or solution every week or so.

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    Jen Reply:

    Yep, I am at the point where I need a few new bottles too because the mechanism isnt’ working as well, but I think I’ve used the one bottle for at least a year. :)

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  22. I have been doing this for years with the pampered chef version of the pumper. There us no way at our house we could let a bottle go a year, but we live on a farm.

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    Jen Reply:

    We go through it so fast too, but I should clarify, I meant that big bottle of the full strength that I bought could last the “typical” family that long. Definitely not you or me. :)

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  23. Danielle says:

    I have been attempting to do this but each time I refill the bottle the pump either breaks or becomes very difficult to pump. Almost as if it’s rejecting the new soap. Has any one had any issues with this?

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  24. stephanie says:

    Can you use regular liquid soap and do this or does it have to be a foaming liquid soap to start with?

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    Jen Reply:

    Regular dish soap will work as well.

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  25. Danielle, I’ve also mixed mine for years. I believe if you put too much soap in, that’s when it gets hard to press. Anybody else have this problem?
    I also do this with a regular soap pump (non-foaming) bottle too. You must press a little softer though, or it will squirt at you. I’m not a huge fan of the foam. :+)

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