March 28, 2014

My #1 Piece of Advice for Newbies – Share Yours: Tasty Tuesday

Oct10

31days beauty budget wide Budgeting for Food: How Do You Handle It? (Free Printable)

This month we’ve been dissecting all areas of savings and our budget, but for Tasty Tuesday’s, we’ve specifically been looking at our food budgets.

We started with an honest discussion talking about our Monthly Food Costs. Last week, I shared my free printable monthly food tracker, while you chimed in with how you handle budgeting your food.

This week, I’d love to hear your #1 bit of advice that you would give to someone new to attacking and slashing their grocery budget WITHOUT coupons.

Yes, I hear many of you groaning right now because coupons were the most significant thing you have implemented to tackle that budget, BUT couponing demands a huge learning curve to really becoming a grocery guru, and I want to encourage those who choose to find other ways to save.

Since the onset of Extreme Couponing, and my first sharing about how it’s just not reality, I’ve had to completely re-think my strategy after Extreme Couponing, which resulted in some additional savings because I was thinking strategically about my shopping.  At our Becoming conference, I did a hour long keynote talk addressing this topic of saving money in the kitchen without coupons, so I know there are many varying options.

When friends and readers ask for my help, but don’t want to coupon, some of my first reactions are as follows:

My list could go on and on, but I know you have some great wisdom to share with readers here and I can’t wait to read your comments.

Imagine that someone is coming to you asking for help to trim their large food budget by hundreds of dollars, Where should they start?

Please share your wisdom in the comments.

TastyTuesday200pix What Are Your Monthly Food Costs? Chime in.

Simple Rules for Tasty Tuesday Parade of Foods –  As always, please link directly to your recipe post and not your blog URL, so that everyone can find the recipe months from now.

Also, link back here in your post so that everyone can join in the fun. It’s will only allow you to link with that done. Due to the number, please limit your links to two posts. Thanks for your understanding.




Comments

  1. I do all of the things you’ve listed, but for people who don’t want to coupon, I also encourage them to stay OUT of the store. Most families make 4-5 trips a week to the grocery store, so every visit can result in impulse buys and budget-busters. By planning our meals ahead of time, you can get your shopping done in one trip, then you don’t go back. My kids have learned to stretch what we do have till the next trip, or to look for it in the stockpile pantry.

    [Reply]

    Meredtih Reply:

    This is probably the biggest thing I realized when I stopped extreme couponing (I was never as extreme as the show but I still got a lot). Make a schedule of everything you do. Make grocery shopping part of it. Plan which days to go and stick to it. If you think of something you need and you are a day away from the trip, make it the next day! It’s pretty simple!

    [Reply]

  2. Be cautious of over-couponing – I sometimes find myself buying things I don’t really need just because I had a coupon.

    [Reply]

  3. Buy store of generic brands. You have to experiment with this, but in many cases, we found that we preferred that store brand to the name brand. These are almost always cheaper than a name brand even on sale with a coupon.

    [Reply]

  4. I too do everything you have listed and they are ALL great ideas! I love coupons, I can’t live without them, but there have been times when my kids or I have been sick and I don’t always get my coupons I need for the month. I think it is SO important to KNOW your stores in your area. You can have the same product at 5 stores with 5 different prices….even with a coupon it still might be cheaper at another store. Do your research and find out the stores in your area and which stores have the best deals. I try and only shop 2 times a month for my family of 5, but I go to two stores each time because 1 store has cheaper meats and one, well, everything else is cheaper there. DO your research….it pays off! LOVE THIS SITE!

    [Reply]

  5. I would suggest all that you mention….meal planning is key. Avoiding convenience foods and cooking from scratch is another great way. We also buy our meat (beef and hogs) in bulk once a year and that seems to cut down on costs as well–although it is a big chunk at one time.

    I know your suggestions are what to do w/o couponing, but I also had this to share. I know great deals can be found with stacking sale prices and coupons together, but that also takes A LOT of time to watch ads and look for coupons. I did that for awhile, and while I know I saved some money, I didn’t really feel that I was saving THAT MUCH considering all the time I was spending! I found that simply looking through the Costco coupon mailer and using those coupons was often saving me more than spending hours going through coupons online/in newspapers and matching with several (!) different stores sales. In my opinion, Costco is great option for saving……and no I am not an employee! :) Anyhow, that just my two cents!

    [Reply]

  6. My best tip is definitely to buy on sale so you don’t have to pay full-price when you run out. I love running out of shampoo, soap, crackers, etc. and shopping my own house for items that I paid rock-bottom for, rather than having to get in the car and hope I find a good sale!

    [Reply]

  7. I’m not sure this would trim hundreds, but this has saved me a lot of money and time over the past few years. Our grocery stores all have a clearance section for different departments. Our Safeway is the best here in our area (and we live in a fairly expensive area–a resort town in CO–where prices are typically quite high). I usually try and stop by in the mornings after I drop my kids off at school, so I’m often one of the only customers in the store and the clearance areas haven’t been picked over yet. There are clearance areas for dairy, meat, frozen and convenience meat (like lunch meat). A few weeks ago I found organic chicken breasts and tenderloins, all had been on sale the week before, so they still had that sale price, and then were clearanced down another 50%. I picked up as much as they had at just a bit over $1 a pound! Stew meat was similar that day. It sort of feels like I’ve hit the jackpot when days like that happen. :)

    [Reply]

  8. Pay attention to the cost per unit — within reason. If you buy a HUGE thing of rice/ cereal/ whatever and it ends up stale or full of bugs, it wasn’t a bargain (which is why I don’t get the extreme couponers). But if it is something I know our family will use all of in a timely manner, I watch the price-per-unit EVERY time — sometimes the smaller sizes are on sale, and cheaper and THEN it’s time to stock up on the small ones (and coupon if you coupon).

    [Reply]

  9. I stop in our bakery thrift store every couple of weeks for sandwich bread, buns, tortillas, etc. I look for manager’s specials at the bakery thrift store and at the grocery store. I’ve found some amazing manager specials and Winn Dixie lately. And I do many of the same things as mentioned already.

    [Reply]

  10. I know this isn’t for everyone, but we moved to a 90% vegetarian diet and we are saving so much! Dried beans, lentils, etc are SO cheap and they fill us up fast. We’ve saved so much, even with moving some of our former meat money to buy additional produce.

    [Reply]

  11. You have so many great ideas that it’s hard to come up with something new! The way I cut food costs are:

    *Shopping in bulk and storing properly, especially things that we use regularly like baking staples; flour, sugar, etc. Meat and chicken; cheese and canned goods. The cheese, especially shredded cheese, can be frozen.

    *I always look at the per unit price. Most stores have this on their shelf tags, but carry a small calculator or use your phone’s to figure it out.

    *I use all of our leftovers and try not to waste any food. I keep a container in the freezer to put little bits of leftovers that aren’t enough to save for another dinner or lunch. When it’s full I make “Leftover Soup” by adding tomatoes, or pasta, or more veggies or whatever I have and seasoning it accordingly. It’s always delicious! My mom did this growing up and my friends would love to come for dinner on “Leftover Soup” night. Soup is always a comfort food. :)

    *I also challenge myself to stay out of the stores and do less frequent shopping. If I run out of bread I throw some in the bread maker. If we’re out of milk we’ll have to make do with powdered for a day or two. It also cuts back on the cost of fuel I use going back and forth to town.

    *Menu planning is key for all of the above!

    [Reply]

  12. Menu plan, cook from scratch, avoid convenience foods, and never shop without a list! Great advice here today! Thanks for hosting. I’m sharing our recipe for simple pumpkin spice muffins. :) ~Lisa

    [Reply]

  13. Soup is cheap to make and goes a long way. Particularly blended soups (rather than chunk) which have been proven to keep you fuller longer. Potatoes make a hearty and inexpensive base and can be jazzed up with herbs, spices and other veggies.

    Fruits can get overripe really quickly, so if my fresh fruits are too ripe for my taste, I toss them in the freezer and use them to make muffins, banana bread or pancakes later on. Apples can be thawed out, whizzed up, and used in place of some of the oil in a cake without changing the taste. Frozen berries make a nice smoothie. Lots of things you can do with a little creativity!

    [Reply]

  14. I have never been a big couponer because most things you can buy with coupons is processed food. Even if you buy something that is “organic” or “natural” it is still processed with a lot of ingredients. I think focusing on eating things with less ingredients and buying local is the way to go. There is so much cost when transporting items far distances. If you can’t grow it in your own backyard then it is probably being shipped pretty far.

    Buy things that grow in your region. Don’t expect to eat oranges all year long. They are not going to be local but more important they are not going to be as nutritious. There is a reason that certain foods are in season when they are.

    [Reply]

  15. The biggest change in our food budget came when I started shopping at scratch and dent grocery stores. Because of the large plain (Mennonite & Amish) community we have near us there are many of them – some without signs in buildings attached to the barn. My sister and I take friends on “tours” of them so they know where they are. Many communities have them. If you have one near you that you’ve been wanting to check out, take note. Here are some things I’ve learned:
    1) just because it’s discounted doesn’t mean there’s something wrong with it.
    2) just because it’s at a store doesn’t mean it’s safe to eat.
    3) check the dates on everything. some foods last well after the “use by” date, some don’t. I routinely buy out of date products if I know how long it will last. Often the only thing that happens to the product is loss of some flavor, not spoilage.
    4) I buy mostly dry and canned goods at these stores because I can buy a lot and not have a spoilage issue.
    5) many companies send their first run foods to stores like these. You will see them in a few weeks in the regular grocery stores.
    6) many companies send their old packaging (after the design has changed) to stores like these.
    7) many of these stores carry foods, in date, direct from the manufacturer.
    8) many of the stores give a money back guarantee just like a regular grocery store.
    9) store brand foods are produced by large name manufacturers. I know, I used to be a package designer and we worked on many store and large name products produced in the same plant from the same ingredients.
    10) be willing to drive a little further to save money. I used to drive an hour once a month to this area to do my “big” grocery shopping. It saves both time AND money shopping that way.

    I also like the comment to stay out of the stores. So true!

    I’ve been doing a 31 day Pantry Challenge this month too. Challenging to say the least. I realize I have a shopping habit I’ve got to address…

    [Reply]

    Jen Reply:

    These are great bits of advice. Thanks for sharing. I would LOVE to live near one of the Mennonite areas. I would soak up their wisdom and homemaking skills, for sure.

    [Reply]

    Lois H. Reply:

    @Jen,
    How would you find one of these places? I live in North Georgia and would LOVE to be able to shop somewhere like this.

    [Reply]

  16. I think the biggest expense cutter for our family is limiting eating out. When we eat out, and it’s $25-$50, I always think how much meat or groceries I could buy with that amount of money.

    [Reply]

  17. Someone already mentioned the clearance aisle. This is a huge savings for us! Most stores have a set time that they put out their meat and produce clearance items. Check with the department manager to see what that time is. We hit it every Sunday and really get a lot of produce that lasts the entire week for pennies on the dollar.

    My family is a food allergy family and that is what my blog is dedicated to cover as well as how to do it on a budget. Over the summer, I did a series called “Frugal Food Allergy Living”. You can check it out and see how to cut costs when you’re dealing with the added expense of food allergies. You’ll notice that it’s not much different from a regular grocery budget.

    http://willingcook.com/category/frugal-food-allergy-living/

    [Reply]

  18. I think I would talk to them first and get a sense of how they grocery shop. First, do they keep a running list and how often do they go to the store? What kind of space do they have, i.e. if they’re a large family but don’t have space to store a lot of milk, they may need to make a second trip for milk.

    I would suggest that they start with a running list, keep their grocery receipts for a month, and keep a running total of how much they spend. It’s hard to make suggestions for changes if someone doesn’t have a sense of what they’re buying and how much they’re spending.

    Actually, this is a fun question because I know where I would go in the conversation after this, and it really depends on how the person handles money and shopping.

    [Reply]

    Jen Reply:

    Great wisdom, Barb – asking those questions are so important. :)

    [Reply]

  19. I think the thing that helps our grocery budget the most is menu planning around what I already have on hand and what is on sale instead of looking through my recipes and deciding what we are in the mood for. Eventually we get to those favorite recipes we just don’t have them every week.

    Also, staying out of the middle aisles in the store.

    [Reply]

  20. Many of us think alike it seems.
    I learned many of these tips from my parents.
    Make a list.
    Shop once a week. Don’t go back to the store. You may think you “need” something, but unless it’s a true “need”–just don’t go.
    Of course only buy what is on sale. Buy enough to last until it will be on sale again. (6-8 wks or so)
    Keep your eyes open.–Many stores have unadvertised specials and you will only see them when you get to the store.
    If you have a salvage grocery store located near your home–check it out.
    Same goes for bakery thrift stores. (I went to one near my house yesterday and the thin-sliced bagels, english muffins, and sandwich rounds were all 2/$1.) Bread freezes well.
    Shift your menus/diets to more real food, less processed products. This saves money without even really trying.
    Thanks for all your tips!

    [Reply]

  21. I save hundreds of dollars a year by baking all of our bread products. pizza crust, hamburger buns, hot dog buns, bread, dinner rolls, cinnamon rolls – you name it! Once you know the basics to working with yeast – the rest are pretty easy!

    [Reply]

  22. I forgot to add in my earlier post….start keeping a ‘price book’ like this one at http://organizedhome.com/kitchen-tips/make-price-book-save-money
    so that you can price compare sales with regular prices at other stores. Sometimes a sale isn’t really a sale when it’s discounted from the featured store’s price, but is still cheaper somewhere else. The price book is especially helpful at big box stores like Costco and Sams–I have a pricebook app on my phone. Also, if you are into organics or have special dietary needs, consider a food COOP like Azure Standard (www.azaurestandard.com)—you still have to watch your prices, but many things I would buy at Whole Foods or Trader Joe’s are much MUCH cheaper through our coop

    [Reply]

    Jen Reply:

    I actually have a price book pdf file all ready to load and share next week. It’s a pain getting it started, but so worth it in the end, especially with the prices changing so much these days.

    [Reply]

  23. One small suggestion…Stay away from all of the individually packaged foods…granola bars, fruit snacks, etc. Buy things more in bulk, and put into individual portions at home (thinking of school lunches, for instance).

    [Reply]

  24. I save quite a bit each year (I’ve never literally added up the savings but I should!) by buying fruits and veggies in season and then preserving (mostly freezing) them to use throughout the year. When people offer us apples or rhubarb, I do the same thing: chop and freeze it, use apples for applesauce, etc.

    I have a small garden since we live in town so we mostly just eat it all right away! I find that since fruits are cheapest when in season, this is the most cost-effective thing for us. We like to use frozen fruits in breads, smoothies, oatmeal, pies, etc throughout the winter, yum!

    Thanks everyone for your ideas, such inspiration to work on cutting my grocery bill even more!

    [Reply]

  25. I agree with with Jen, making things from scratch and utilize working smarter not harder when you’re cooking. At least double or sometimes triple recipes and cool completely. Freeze the next day and you’ll have a night off cooking plus save money by buying less for your dinner menu. Menu planning is a must with freezer cooking so you can thaw items prior to cooking. I sometimes do cooking/baking but we always eat on what we’re having so I’m not doing a once a month freezer cooking session for 6-8 hours. By doubling each time I make dinner, I’m always stocking my freezer.

    [Reply]

  26. Invest in a yogurt maker, bread maker and crock pot and use them. I find these items at yard sales and thrift stores all the time. These 3 items make life so much easier and cheaper for the busy family or someone with limited energy and a tight budget. You can cook up large batches of soups, stews, chicken, etc. in that crock pot while you are busy at work or even busy with taking your kids all over the place or homeschooling (as was our case). Yogurt is easy to make and so good for you and can be used as a substitute for sour cream among other things. Bread, who doesn’t love bread? ;) I have already worn out one bread maker. I use it not only to bake bread in but also to mix and proof dough for pizza, pita bread, etc.. I love that I can go to work and have it set to have my bread ready and hot when I get home.

    Cut back on meat and use more whole grains and veggies in your cooking. When you find a good deal on produce (or you grow your own and have an abundance), freeze, dehydrate or can it for future meals. Take up hunting or fishing if you do not already do so. Our family is still eating venison from last year that is in the freezer and hunting season opens here on Friday once again. Trade with friends. Our son regularly trades us venison (he got 2 deer last year and we got none) for fresh fruit and veggies. In the winter we give him frozen or canned goods that we have stockpiled. If anyone in our family runs across a great deal we pick some up for the rest of the family also.

    [Reply]

  27. Along with the cooking from scratch tip, I recommend not paying for CONVENIENCE! I never buy boneless, skinless chicken breasts. I buy bone-in, cut off the meat myself, and use the bones and trimming for chicken stock! I don’t buy pre-chopped fruit or veggies or anything really that I can do myself really easily.

    [Reply]

  28. Learn the organization of the store you shop at. Write your shopping list in a way that you start on one end of the store and finish on the other. That minimizes time in the store, which minimizes opportunities for impulse purchases.

    Also, beware a “new low price” sticker in the store. My grocery places these on products – after raising the price! Yes, it’s a new price, but it’s not necessarily a better one!

    [Reply]

  29. a huge THANK YOU for this post!!! i do coupon when i can. . . but homeschooling four kiddos and working at a very part-time job, i find that couponing to the extreme is extremely time-consuming and i find that i end up extremely frustrated for the little in savings that i acquire. (did i use the word extreme enough, lol???)
    the biggest resource i’m looking for is lower or non-meat recipes that are also high protein, as that has to be a part of my diet. and i know that would help the budget immensely.
    again, love this series. it’s one of three that i signed up to receive in my inbox, and i am so thankful to have found your site.
    steph

    [Reply]

  30. My best hint is to cook like it is 1950. I love my old Betty Crocker Cookbook, it is filled with foods made from simple and in expensive ingredients. I also say don’t be afraid of dessert :). People don’t hesitate to buy granola bars but won’t eat homemade oatmeal raisin cookies?

    [Reply]

    Suzy Reply:

    @cheriami, I totally agree. I love old cookbooks. Whenever I am in a used book store I always look at the vintage cookbooks. They don’t have ingredients like margarine or low fat (insert product here). The older the better.

    [Reply]

    Karen Reply:

    @Suzy, Me too. In fact I would even go so far as to suggest sometimes cooking like it’s 1930 or earlier. The point is that all commercial convenience food (most of what is in a modern grocery store) is just a copy of something that used to come out of a private kitchen. Go back there. It was possible then without all the appliances, it is certainly possible now. Just find out how. A few years ago I thought I couldn’t make bread or yogurt or ricotta or sour cream. Now I make it or we don’t have it. Because I make it, we always have it and it’s always cheaper and better than the store version. Pick one thing to learn at a time. Once you are comfortable with the process, pick another.

    The less that has been done to any product before you get it, the cheaper it will be. I never use coupons. They are not common where I live, few stores will accept computer printed ones, and I don’t use many things that have “manufacturers” who issue coupons.

    [Reply]

  31. We shop at Grocery Outlet. The things we find that expire tomorrow so they are clearanced down to pennies, is astounding. One time they had 1lb blocks of cracker barrel sharp white cheddar cheese for 99c each. We bought as many as we could and threw them in the freezer! Last week it was philidelphia cream cheese for 45c each. I stock pile what ever can be frozen and I shop their clearance produce too.

    I got tired of coupons. I don’t want to run out on Sunday for the paper nor do I want to pay for it to be delivered. The amount of time I was spending trying to find deals that were ALWAYS wiped out of our small town stores, was ridiculous and wasteful. Not to mention the waste of gas to end up with a rain check.

    Cook from scratch but also, make extra. If you are making enchiladas, make an extra pan to freeze. This way, on nights you have a lot going on or don’t feel like cooking, you can pull it out instead of hitting fast food.

    Blessings,
    Mel
    Please feel free to stop by: Trailing After God

    My other tip is to find a store with bulk bins that are good prices. We have Winco in the Pacific NW. Prices are pretty unbeatable. I don’t need my flour to say Pillsbury on it :)

    [Reply]

  32. I would recommend shopping for the meat that is on clearance and freeze it. I can get pot roasts, pork chops and so much more when I buy the meat that is about to ‘expire” and I just put it straight in our deep freezer and thaw when we are ready to eat it.

    [Reply]

  33. My tip would be to check the sale tag at the store to see when the sale ends. I normally buy dog food at Walmart but my local grocery store had it on sale for significantly cheaper. When I looked closely at the sale tag I realized that it wasn’t just on sale for the week but would be that price for the next 3 months! Had I not checked that I would have gone back to Walmart and paid more all summer long.

    [Reply]

  34. I have started ordering my groceries online and having them delivered from our local grocery store. The delivery charge is minimal and I avoid shopping when I am hungry. The running tally as I shop online keeps my budget in check. I highly recommend it! I also cook as much at home as possible…it’s amazing how much restaurant food adds up.

    [Reply]

  35. I’ll probably get some disagreement, but: 1) Shop at Walmart: I’ve done comparison shopping for years & overall they have the best prices plus they will match ads from other stores. Even w/”Super Doubles” I often get it for less at Walmart than the competitor.
    2) Don’t buy junk: the prepackaged, pre-prepared, full of empty calories, fillers cost more in the long run (without even counting the later medical costs) & provide less satisfaction plus poor nutrition. Yes, I buy some chips, cookies, etc. but not many or often, & I don’t buy any of the frozen “meals”/snacks or any of the “just add….” stuff. Fresh items are so much more fulfilling.
    3) Cook extra of everything & freeze it. Saves time, energy, money, & makes a quick meal on those nights when you don’t have time to start from scratch.

    [Reply]

  36. I do love cooking and would do anything just to cook my favorite food.

    [Reply]

  37. I have a FREE e-book on this very subject: http://thepeacefulmom.com/2011/08/19/free-e-book-save-more-clip-less/

    In Save More-Clip Less, I share how I recovered from Extreme Couponing and give tons of practical and specific ways to save on groceries WITHOUT coupons. Using these strategies, I feed my family of six including three teenagers and a child who has to eat gluten free for $100 a week. There are meal ideas and helpful planning tools included as well.

    Just click the link if you’re interested. :)

    [Reply]

  38. I don’t think anyone else has mentioned shopping at Aldi. Check to see if you have one in your area. They carry a lot of basics in generic-unknown brand with occasional name brand items. I have been shopping the majority of our groceries here for over 11 years. We find most items to be as good as name-brand and sometimes better. They also guarantee if you don’t like it for any reason they will replace the item and refund your money. Check out their site at aldi.us for a location near you.

    No I don’t work for Aldi or am compensated in any way, would be nice tho’ =)

    [Reply]

    Margery Reply:

    @Andrea, I was just coming here to post about shopping at Aldi. I used to be a heavy couponner. Unfortunately, food prices are rising, coupon values are dropping, and stores are becoming increasingly more restrictive in their coupon policies, so I was not saving nearly as much as a year ago. Aldi is now my go-to place for low prices. I can also get cheap produce and rice at H-Mart, which is an Asian grocery.

    [Reply]

    Jen Reply:

    I agree. I have recently started posting the top Aldi deals of the week on my facebook page, since I have started incorporating shopping there at last 2x/month.

    [Reply]

    Tracey Reply:

    Just this past 2 months I’ve been going to Aldi. I normally shop at Publix (main grocery chain here in Florida and the south), but recently their prices have been going really high. No complaints with Aldi, yet, and my grocery bill has greatly reduced! They send me an email each week with specials.

    Check this out….Pumpkins at Publix were $5.99 each. Aldi $1.99! and no they weren’t rotten. Publix milk $3.79, Aldi $2.99.
    I don’t work for Aldi either!

    [Reply]

  39. I agree with everyone. Make more and freeze. Don’t buy preprepared. I like to buy meat and poultry in bulk and make up crock pot meals in baggies with the the fixin’s already in the bag. Great for busy days. Using less meat and poultry and more vegetables saves lots of money. Meal planning is essential. Stay out of the store and make the least amoun of trips that you can. My menu plan has generic name sof meals like : caseroles, crock pot, pasta. This way I can substitute chicken vs. beef for a casserole meal or pasta meatl. Pasta can substitute red sauce for cream sauce. Use what you have and only buy the extras you need for the meal plan. Make sure each crock pot meal will have left overs for later in the week or to freeze.
    Thansk to everyone for all the great ideas. I agree that extreme couponing or even mild takes up too muhc time. I would be cooking more with that time and saving a lots of cooking time later.

    [Reply]

  40. Great tips!! I need to take notes. :)

    [Reply]

  41. Such great tips! Over the past year, our family has done a major overhaul in the way we eat. Our perspective has changed a lot. Instead of living to eat – eating to live. I’ve simplified our meals quite a bit, going for quality instead of quantity. A good soup – it’s enough. Or a grilled chicken salad – it’s enough. We have learned to eat until content instead of feeling stuffed. We eat a lot of beans and rice and eggs, all inexpensive and healthy. We were blessed with a huge garden this summer which fed us for months, and I canned quite a bit as well. We also live in a community with a large Amish population with a great discount store. Great produce and great prices which I am so thankful for. Thanks so much for your series. I love it!

    [Reply]

  42. This idea is one I’ve just implemented the past month and have saved a ton. Our Wal-Mart has “price match guarantee.” Which means that I can print / bring in the ads from any other local store (I usually walk in with 3-4 grocery store ads / Aldi Ad), and they will give me their price. So in other words, instead of driving all over town for the specials that are supposed to get you into their store, you can get those great deals in one place. All of the door-buster specials are available in one place, as long as the ad has a price and date on it. Yes, you do even better than Wal-mart roll-back prices! I rarely coupon, but I do this money saver every week.

    [Reply]

Trackbacks

  1. [...] are some great money saving ideas on this post over at Beauty and Bedlam regarding saving money for your groceries. I’m not a big coupon girl – too many of them are for [...]

  2. [...] and Soul Blog Hop, Tasty Tuesday, Monday Mania, Real Food Wednesday, and Fat [...]

Share Your Thoughts

*